The People of God Must Regain Their Rightful Place in Society

America’s DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE was written as a proclamation to the world of the reasons why the colonial leaders called for a separation from England. But while the declaration gave a detailed list of legal offenses that England had left unresolved, the Founders saw these as more than isolated wrongs. Rather; they saw them as part of a predetermined plan to take away their religious liberties and reestablish the church of England to rule over their hearts and souls, thus spiritually enslaving the colonies. In that light, one understands the power on Patrick Henry’s fiery words, “give me liberty or give me death.’

Faced with such prospects, the Declaration stated that the American colonists were set to defend “the laws of nature and of nature’s God”- words that define the principle upon which the Founders stood. The laws of nature were understood to mean the will of God for man as revealed to man’s reason. However, because man is fallen and his reason does not always comprehend this law, God gave His law in the Bible to make it absolutely clear.

THUS, IT WAS THE CHURCHES THAT became the primary source that stirred the fires of liberty. Many Church leaders told the colonists that the British government was usurping their God-given rights, and the King and Parliament were violating the laws of God. The Founding Fathers were convinced that it was their sacred duty to begin a revolution to uphold the law of God against the unjust and oppressive laws of tyrannical men. The fight for political freedom was seen as a sacred cause because civil liberty was an inalienable right, according to God’s natural law.

The New England ministers, in particular were decisive in rallying the popular moral support for war against England. They pressed their congregations to overthrow King George because they believed that rebellion to tyrants was obedience to God. From many pulpits, ministers recruited troops and strengthened them battle with patriotic sermons. While the church leaders were well aware of the Biblical admonition to submit to civil authorities (Romans 13), they clearly noted there are numerous passages that recognize the need to resist ungodly authority. For example, when the apostles were commanded by the Sanhedrin to cease preaching that Jesus Christ had risen from the dead. But Peter boldly retorted: “We ought to obey God rather than men.” (Acts 5:29).

Therefore, it is no coincidence that one of the watchwords of the American Revolution was “No King but King Jesus.” For most of the patriots, their faith gave them the courage to stand on God’s word and risk their lives and properties to break the tyranny of an unjust human authority. In their Christian world view, obedience to God took precedence over country, over government, and their primary allegiance was to the Lord Jesus Christ.

In 1775, the Lutheran pastor John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg preached a sermon on Ecclesiastes 3:1, “To everything there is a season, a time for every purpose under heaven.” Concluding the message, he declared, “In the language of the Holy Writ, there is a time for all things. There is a time to preach and a time to fight. And now is the time to fight.” He then threw off his clerical robes to reveal the uniform of a Revolutionary Army officer. That afternoon, he marched off with 300 men to join General George Washington’s troops and became Colonel of the 8th Virginia Regiment.

Numerous ministries turned the colonial resistance into a righteous cause and served at every level in the conflict, from military chaplains to members of state legislatures to taking up arms and leading troops into battle. Ultimately, after two main British armies were captured by the Continental Army at Saratoga in 1777 and Yorktown in 1781, the other words of Patrick Henry to his fellow Virginians proved true. “Three million people, armed with the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us.”

The fighting spirit of Christians throughout history serves as a sterling reminder that in order to sustain liberty in our republic we must be willing to first learn about true liberty. Then “We the People” are commissioned to restore liberty where it has been lost and then sustain it everywhere. Many pastors have been purposely misleading their flocks into both utter spiritual and natural oblivion. They have lulled many generations to sleep via the fly away doctrine which has people thinking they are being raptured out of here at any given time. But the word plainly tells us to occupy until “HE” returns. In other words, do not cower away in the dark corners of society and complain about how bad things are if you refuse to utilize your God given talents to occupy positions of influence, business ownership, proper parenting, good schools, etc.

Both Biblical and American history have numerous examples of mighty men of valor who left an indelible mark on their respective societies. God prefers men even flawed men who have the strength of character to stand and fight against corruption and tyranny. But those who sit and do nothing or allow those who wish to corrupt, take over and change their institutions are only destined to be either swept away or dominated. I believe that America will be great again because of a large remnant of Americans refuse to allow those who desire to destroy our republic to have their way. Do not be concerned about the giants of evil in the land. If we fight, pray and have faith, like the patriots of old the victory is ours for the taking. God bless you, God Bless America and may America bless God.

Posted in Contributors.

Ron Edwards

Ron Edwards produces and hosts The Edwards Notebook, an award winning syndicated radio commentary. He is a talented and gifted commentator with over two decades of experience.The Edwards Notebook airs in Detroit AM1400 WDTK and 94.5 FM, Petoskey and AM790 WLBE,NE Orlando, Fl., News talk AM 1090 Muskegon, FM 92.7 Detroit. AM14KTEM, Temple, Texas, WLSS AM 960 in Sarasota,Fl.

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